Rules for the Trail Stepping off the pavement changes what is important and can set you free—if you let it.

1. Ditch the watch The first rule for the runner moving from the road or track to the trail is simple: Lose your watch. The best way to ruin a trail run is to try to quantify it the same way you would a road run. If you want to record your totals, at least… [view more]

Back to School: 4 Lessons from the Cross Country Team Running your best requires recovery, regular maintenance and reducing stress, regardless of your age.

As a cross country coach for more than a decade, I continue to learn lessons that help my own running. High school runners may be less than half my age, but they face similar challenges, and the controlled setting lets me try out new tactics and observe trends over the course of a season and… [view more]

4 Facts About Recovery for the Runner Always Stay Active

If you visit the Rift Valley of Kenya and spend some time among the world’s greatest distance runners, you’ll quickly notice that everywhere you look everyone is walking. They also run, of course, long miles on red dirt roads and mind-blowing speed sessions on the track. But walking is how they get around. They walk… [view more]

How to Find Your Individualized Running Plan Learn To Act Like a Scientist In Your Training

Find your best running program

“We are each an experiment of one,” George Sheehan famously wrote regarding the need to individualize our running. While oft-quoted, Sheehan’s maxim is, however, too rarely applied. A quick google search reveals a wealth of research proving the maxim’s truth. A 2009 Swedish study on aerobic capacity, for example, found “substantial interindividual variability in training-induced… [view more]

Take to the Trail for a Natural Stride Go Off Road to Get Out of Your Rut

Trail Running

You probably already know that getting off the road is good for your running health. Usually this is attributed to the softer surface creating less impact. More important, however, is that the trail is uneven, requiring you to change your stride with every step. That variability will not only spread stress across different structures in… [view more]

Food is Good Three Ways to Improve Your Nutrition Without Obsessing Over Your Diet

Food is good.

There are only a few aspects of human behavior more elemental than running. One of those is eating. We eat to fuel our bodies and minds, of course, but eating represents far more than that in the human experience. From the beginning of time, preparing, sharing and enjoying food has been a central part of… [view more]

Four Ways to Improve Your Feet at Your Desk Improving foot health and strength can happen all day.

Topo MT-2

Feet do a lot of work when you’re running. And while experts agree that they often get more attention than they deserve when it comes to influencing the stride, they often get less help than they need to perform their job well. That job involves cushioning your landing, balancing and supporting your weight, and assisting… [view more]

The Whole Athlete: Three Truths About Foot Strike You can have an effective stride no matter what part of your foot hits the ground first.

No aspect of running form has garnered more attention than foot strike. For many runners, any talk of form boils down to whether you are a heel striker or a forefoot striker. Experts agree, however, that the emphasis on foot strike is misplaced. Here’s why: 1) Foot strike is a result, not a cause. Coaches, biomechanists,… [view more]

The Whole Athlete: The Fine Art of Goal Setting The right goals can motivate you to new heights. The wrong ones can send you back under the covers.

What gets you out of bed in the morning? What drives you to run more each week, go longer on the weekends, dig deeper on speed days? For many runners, motivation comes in the form of a race goal, a date on the calendar when we want to run our best. Choosing an appropriate goal… [view more]

The Whole Athlete: Five Habits That Can Sabotage Your Run Have these negative patterns snuck into your routine during the winter cold and slop?

A fresh breeze is in the air and runners are out on the roads and trails, dreaming of great performances in spring road races. Often, however, we emerge from our caves and find ourselves unusually sluggish. Our running feels difficult, our strides awkward and gunked up. To shake off these cobwebs, it may be helpful… [view more]